Youth EB Picks: Slip of the Tongue from Youth Radio

October 9, 2013 in GPRX Blog by Phuong Tseng

agnesgtr

Photo: agnesgtr

After reviewing about 12 different youth-produced audio pieces in the past 3 months, I came across so many inspirational, empowering, motivational, and powerful stories. These pieces range from a conversation about relaxation methods, summer jobs, queer youth’s perspective of Valentine's Day, to conversations about death, greeting people with respect and many more.

Last but not least, the last piece that I would like to recommend to you all is Andriel Luis’s spoken word performance, Slip of the Tongue. This piece is a very powerful and insightful piece that offers many layers, dialogues between the poet and an individual, and visual images to understanding mainstream beauty and its negative impact on today’s youth. I was extremely excited and blown away by Andriel’s articulation and wisdom. I urge you all to listen and enjoy this intellectual piece!

For more information about my review of Slip of the Tongue, you can view the review below.

Slip of the Tongue is a deconstructive audio piece produced by Adriel Luis. Through spoken word, Adriel addresses issues that many female teenagers and women face in today’s society. Adriel touches on the social construction and internalization of mainstream standards of beauty, resistance and deconstruction of beauty in relation to ethnic identity, society’s perception and perpetuation of masculinity, and social consumption of beauty products. This is an excellent audio piece that deconstructs societal construction of beauty and reminds everyone to embrace their ethnic makeup and roots.

Lastly, I just wanted to thank Generation PRX and Jones for this amazing opportunity.

Sincerely,

Phuong Tseng

A Child's View of Domestic Violence by Valencia McMurray of MPR News

August 10, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

For fourteen years, a singular event has shaped Valencia McMurray's life: her mother, Charlene Sanders, was violently attacked by her father when she was 6 years old. More than a quarter of American children experience parents physically fighting each other at some time in their lives. Early researchers into family violence often considered children to be "invisible victims," but that view is changing.

MPR Photo/Jeffrey Thompson

Valencia's story follows how she, her mother, and her siblings reacted that night and how they've dealt through the years, mostly by trying to forget what happened. Her mom actually says she was surprised nobody asked her how her kids were doing. Now, Valencia reports that new focus on the affects of domestic violence on children have helped her and will help more kids in the future.

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We've featured a few other stories from the MPR News Youth Series. Give them a listen and you'll travel to Washington DC to meet the president and to California to visit a Japanese Internment camp.

Music on this week's episode is by Deal the Villain, our fave.

Remembering Barbara Jean by Patrick Presby of Blunt Youth Radio

June 15, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

The Blunt Youth Radio Project in Portland, Maine also includes a program at the Long Creek Youth Development Center, a juvenile detention facility. This program helps with literacy skills, computer skills, and is also– shhh!– a fun extracurricular for the students. The features are usually personal essays geared toward helping the writers in their rehabilitation, or they cover an aspect of detained life. One of the most famous Long Creek stories, "What's In the Food?" was actually featured on This American Life.
This essay is by Patrick Presby. Pat remembers his step-mother, Barbara Jean, from the first time they met, to the last time he saw her. Though the 11 years in between were sometimes hard for Patrick – including a turn to juvenile crime – he remembers the care she gave him, and her incredible capacity to forgive.
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Today, Patrick is doing well and is a proud father to his son.  He lives in Gray, Maine. Read a really nice profile about him and other students doing work in the Dominican Republic in the Portland Press Herald, where the above photo is from. Listen to some more work by Long Creek kids on PRX.
Songs in this episode are on the album Celadon by Macaw / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0

Homestead Childhood by Grace Edgerton of City High Radio

May 18, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

A homestead cabin in Wisconsin

It’s a childhood dream, to grow up in the wild, close to nature, maybe in a tree-house, Swiss Family Robinson style. But in reality, it might not be as easy as the picture books show. Grace Edgerton grew up on a homestead out in the Arizona desert, initially living in tents before the house was built.

She now lives in Tucson and attends City High School, a small charter school with an awesome radio program. And when it came time for her to make a feature, there was no other question as to what story Grace would tell: her own.

This episode includes an interview with the producer herself!

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The book I reference in my interview with Grace is called This Life Is In Your Hands, by Melissa Coleman. It's about another childhood spent going "back to the land" in Maine, that ends quite tragically.

The music in this episode is by Toumani Diabate, a master of the kora, a 21 string harp from Mali.

There's Nobody Listening by Charlotte Carr of Youth Radio Vermont

May 5, 2010 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

bored at church
http://www.flickr.com/photos/duckducksnap/ / CC BY-ND 2.0
Feeling bored at church? Well, have we got a solution for you! Satan! No, no. JK.
This week I'm presenting a piece from Youth Radio Vermont, a shortie. It's this really candid and immature sounding interview with a kid who thinks church is boring, harasses a Mormon missionary, and goofs around about being a Satanist. But when you listen closely there's like, A LOT going on between the lines. You can hear the defense mechanism engaging. Jesus-loving step-dads, mother's dying of cancer, Goths and drugs, needing a free meal. But the kid is just endearing and giggly and the same with the interviewer, Charlotte Carr.
The sound quality is also top notch, sounds great in headphones. You feel like you are there with them.
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This piece was part of a larger series on people's personal relationships with religion and spirituality. Listen to the rest of them on Youth Radio Vermont's PRX page.

Delphine Dora / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 provided the off-key intro.
Liturgy / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 provided the chanty and hardcore outro.