Youth EB Picks: Wise Words of our Parents from City High Radio

July 5, 2013 in GPRX Blog by Kamna Shastri

Words of Our Parents ImageBefore I clicked ‘play’ and heard City High Radio'sThe Words of Our Parents’, I was expecting some sort of confession about how irritating parents really are. That is not what this piece is. The producer, Grace, does a beautiful job putting together this vox-pop piece, which is more like a conversation than your average vox pop. By asking only one question in the beginning and stringing on answers from various people, Grace puts together little nuggets of insight in a very powerful way. The casual style of the piece – no copy, just cuts – makes its messages all the more resonant with the listener.
This piece is a reminder to take the words our parents say to heart. While listening, I was transported to a place reminiscent of the safety that only parents can give. There are mixed anecdotes of things parents have said, some hurtful, some true; the wide variety only supports the idea that parents wish the best for their children.
One thing I felt would enhance this piece is a follow up. Such a follow up might be to ask the same question Grace asks to the parents rather than the children.

Maybe it is because of a personal recognition of how not to take parents for granted, but this piece to me is pretty flawless; it turns the little things our parents say into perhaps some of the biggest wisdoms of our lives.

Remembering Barbara Jean by Patrick Presby of Blunt Youth Radio

June 15, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

The Blunt Youth Radio Project in Portland, Maine also includes a program at the Long Creek Youth Development Center, a juvenile detention facility. This program helps with literacy skills, computer skills, and is also– shhh!– a fun extracurricular for the students. The features are usually personal essays geared toward helping the writers in their rehabilitation, or they cover an aspect of detained life. One of the most famous Long Creek stories, "What's In the Food?" was actually featured on This American Life.
This essay is by Patrick Presby. Pat remembers his step-mother, Barbara Jean, from the first time they met, to the last time he saw her. Though the 11 years in between were sometimes hard for Patrick – including a turn to juvenile crime – he remembers the care she gave him, and her incredible capacity to forgive.
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Today, Patrick is doing well and is a proud father to his son.  He lives in Gray, Maine. Read a really nice profile about him and other students doing work in the Dominican Republic in the Portland Press Herald, where the above photo is from. Listen to some more work by Long Creek kids on PRX.
Songs in this episode are on the album Celadon by Macaw / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0

Homestead Childhood by Grace Edgerton of City High Radio

May 18, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

A homestead cabin in Wisconsin

It’s a childhood dream, to grow up in the wild, close to nature, maybe in a tree-house, Swiss Family Robinson style. But in reality, it might not be as easy as the picture books show. Grace Edgerton grew up on a homestead out in the Arizona desert, initially living in tents before the house was built.

She now lives in Tucson and attends City High School, a small charter school with an awesome radio program. And when it came time for her to make a feature, there was no other question as to what story Grace would tell: her own.

This episode includes an interview with the producer herself!

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The book I reference in my interview with Grace is called This Life Is In Your Hands, by Melissa Coleman. It's about another childhood spent going "back to the land" in Maine, that ends quite tragically.

The music in this episode is by Toumani Diabate, a master of the kora, a 21 string harp from Mali.

Homelessness: It Could Happen to Anyone, Even My Dad by Iris SanGiovanni of Blunt Youth Radio

August 25, 2010 in Youthcast by Molly Adams



Iris and her father, Robert

When Blunt Youth Radio member Iris SanGiovanni was eight years old, her dad became homeless for six months after her parents divorced. A few years later, she had the chance to talk with him about his experience.

This conversation exposes the myths and stereotypes that we have about homeless people. Iris even realizes after talking to her dad how much of the advice that he gave her came from his experience. After listening to this, I had to take a moment and reflect on my own life and I felt grateful for what I had. So thank you, Iris and Robert SanGiovanni, for sharing this story with such a large audience.

The Maine Association of Broadcasters awarded Iris's reporting first place in its radio features category, and this was not a special youth category. This was for the whole state of Maine! So congratulations Iris for representing the kind of thoughtful writing and stories that young people are making!

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WEB EXCLUSIVE!

I gave Iris a call while she was at a meeting for Blunt. She told me about her new expectations for herself after creating an award-winning piece at the age of 14 and her new perspectives on family after interviewing her father.

(Listen to the interview!)

Music in this podcast was provided by the Free Music Archive. The intro is called Ringtones by (Xiu Xiu) / CC BY-NC 3.0. The outro is called Hot Brick by CAVE.

There's Nobody Listening by Charlotte Carr of Youth Radio Vermont

May 5, 2010 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

bored at church
http://www.flickr.com/photos/duckducksnap/ / CC BY-ND 2.0
Feeling bored at church? Well, have we got a solution for you! Satan! No, no. JK.
This week I'm presenting a piece from Youth Radio Vermont, a shortie. It's this really candid and immature sounding interview with a kid who thinks church is boring, harasses a Mormon missionary, and goofs around about being a Satanist. But when you listen closely there's like, A LOT going on between the lines. You can hear the defense mechanism engaging. Jesus-loving step-dads, mother's dying of cancer, Goths and drugs, needing a free meal. But the kid is just endearing and giggly and the same with the interviewer, Charlotte Carr.
The sound quality is also top notch, sounds great in headphones. You feel like you are there with them.
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This piece was part of a larger series on people's personal relationships with religion and spirituality. Listen to the rest of them on Youth Radio Vermont's PRX page.

Delphine Dora / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 provided the off-key intro.
Liturgy / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 provided the chanty and hardcore outro.