Youth EB Picks: Slip of the Tongue from Youth Radio

October 9, 2013 in GPRX Blog by Phuong Tseng

agnesgtr

Photo: agnesgtr

After reviewing about 12 different youth-produced audio pieces in the past 3 months, I came across so many inspirational, empowering, motivational, and powerful stories. These pieces range from a conversation about relaxation methods, summer jobs, queer youth’s perspective of Valentine's Day, to conversations about death, greeting people with respect and many more.

Last but not least, the last piece that I would like to recommend to you all is Andriel Luis’s spoken word performance, Slip of the Tongue. This piece is a very powerful and insightful piece that offers many layers, dialogues between the poet and an individual, and visual images to understanding mainstream beauty and its negative impact on today’s youth. I was extremely excited and blown away by Andriel’s articulation and wisdom. I urge you all to listen and enjoy this intellectual piece!

For more information about my review of Slip of the Tongue, you can view the review below.

Slip of the Tongue is a deconstructive audio piece produced by Adriel Luis. Through spoken word, Adriel addresses issues that many female teenagers and women face in today’s society. Adriel touches on the social construction and internalization of mainstream standards of beauty, resistance and deconstruction of beauty in relation to ethnic identity, society’s perception and perpetuation of masculinity, and social consumption of beauty products. This is an excellent audio piece that deconstructs societal construction of beauty and reminds everyone to embrace their ethnic makeup and roots.

Lastly, I just wanted to thank Generation PRX and Jones for this amazing opportunity.

Sincerely,

Phuong Tseng

How to Report Your Own Story from Radio Rookies and Hive NYC

September 18, 2013 in GPRX Blog by Jones Franzel

Happy day! Radio Rookies and Hive NYC have paired up to create an animated short video that answers that perennial youth radio question: What should my story be about?

Along with the video is a blog post full of prompting questions and suggested activities to get your wheels turning. Now all you have left to do is make your story and post it to PRX!

A Child's View of Domestic Violence by Valencia McMurray of MPR News

August 10, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

For fourteen years, a singular event has shaped Valencia McMurray's life: her mother, Charlene Sanders, was violently attacked by her father when she was 6 years old. More than a quarter of American children experience parents physically fighting each other at some time in their lives. Early researchers into family violence often considered children to be "invisible victims," but that view is changing.

MPR Photo/Jeffrey Thompson

Valencia's story follows how she, her mother, and her siblings reacted that night and how they've dealt through the years, mostly by trying to forget what happened. Her mom actually says she was surprised nobody asked her how her kids were doing. Now, Valencia reports that new focus on the affects of domestic violence on children have helped her and will help more kids in the future.

Play

We've featured a few other stories from the MPR News Youth Series. Give them a listen and you'll travel to Washington DC to meet the president and to California to visit a Japanese Internment camp.

Music on this week's episode is by Deal the Villain, our fave.

Remembering Barbara Jean by Patrick Presby of Blunt Youth Radio

June 15, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

The Blunt Youth Radio Project in Portland, Maine also includes a program at the Long Creek Youth Development Center, a juvenile detention facility. This program helps with literacy skills, computer skills, and is also– shhh!– a fun extracurricular for the students. The features are usually personal essays geared toward helping the writers in their rehabilitation, or they cover an aspect of detained life. One of the most famous Long Creek stories, "What's In the Food?" was actually featured on This American Life.
This essay is by Patrick Presby. Pat remembers his step-mother, Barbara Jean, from the first time they met, to the last time he saw her. Though the 11 years in between were sometimes hard for Patrick – including a turn to juvenile crime – he remembers the care she gave him, and her incredible capacity to forgive.
Play
Today, Patrick is doing well and is a proud father to his son.  He lives in Gray, Maine. Read a really nice profile about him and other students doing work in the Dominican Republic in the Portland Press Herald, where the above photo is from. Listen to some more work by Long Creek kids on PRX.
Songs in this episode are on the album Celadon by Macaw / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0

Homestead Childhood by Grace Edgerton of City High Radio

May 18, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

A homestead cabin in Wisconsin

It’s a childhood dream, to grow up in the wild, close to nature, maybe in a tree-house, Swiss Family Robinson style. But in reality, it might not be as easy as the picture books show. Grace Edgerton grew up on a homestead out in the Arizona desert, initially living in tents before the house was built.

She now lives in Tucson and attends City High School, a small charter school with an awesome radio program. And when it came time for her to make a feature, there was no other question as to what story Grace would tell: her own.

This episode includes an interview with the producer herself!

Play

The book I reference in my interview with Grace is called This Life Is In Your Hands, by Melissa Coleman. It's about another childhood spent going "back to the land" in Maine, that ends quite tragically.

The music in this episode is by Toumani Diabate, a master of the kora, a 21 string harp from Mali.

Palestinian Hoop Dreams by Ahmed Hemeid of Youth Media Project

April 6, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

Photo by Flickr user JeffreyLCohen

Palestinian Hoop Dreams is a thoughtful story by Ahmed Hemeid, a student at United World College in New Mexico.  Ahmed played a lot of basketball back home. After preparing for a championship tournament, Ahmed and his teammates find out that it is canceled due to the beginning of the Gaza War.  Ahmed’s “Palestinian Hoop Dreams” is an amazing story that shows the pervasiveness of war and its effects on youth in the Gaza Strip.

Play

Palestinian Hoop Dreams was written and narrated by Ahmed Hemeid, edited by Eliot Fisher and produced by Youth Media Project, through their educational program at the United World College. We've featured another one of these stories before, Peculiar Privelege and the Elegy by Ece Erdagoz. But head to PRX to listed to Green Army Hat, about a funny and testy relationship between the reporter and his grandfather, and Scare Those Ghosts Away, about the difference in history lessons in China and Japan.

The Gaza War is back in the news as reports of war crimes and possible prosecution is debated. Read more from the Israeli newspaper Haaretz.

Today's intro and outro music is by one of our favorite beatmakers, Deal the Villain.

I'll Be Sittin' by Keith "Blu" Warfield from the Louder Than A Bomb 2010 Series

March 23, 2011 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

Performers at Louder Than A Bomb 2010 by Flickr user cvyn2010

The Louder Than A Bomb poetry slam in Chicago just wrapped up a few weeks ago. This gathering of literary young people is ostensibly a competition, but when you look it up in the news, its always hard to find out who the winners were. Why? Well, because LTAB is about anything but winning. Like most poetry slams, its an event for storytellers, people who have intensely funny, intensely scary, intensely romantic, and of course, intensely personal stories to tell. How are you supposed to really judge something like that?
From a series of recordings from last year's slam, I wanted to share a poem by Keith "Blu" Warfield. It's about the moment he and his girlfriend first looked at each other and were like, "Oh yeah. It's on." I'm a sucker for a good love story.
Play
Listen to some of this year's contestant's over at WBEZ Chicago's website. WBEZ is a media sponsor for Louder Than A Bomb and they also give me a paycheck for hosting a show on Vocalo. Full disclosure and plug for me!
Intro music: Rage Against Death (Stouffi The Stouves) / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Outro music: Death Proof (Fancy Mike) / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
Both were found at the deliciously eclectic Free Music Archive.

Japanese-American Granddaughter Questions Internment by Mara Kumagai Fink for MPR News Youth Radio

December 29, 2010 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

A New Year usually means a new beginning. It’s time to look back, figure out what worked and what didn’t and then move on with your life. But obviously there are some events and histories that you can’t abandon so easily. Mara Kumagai Fink’s family has that kind of American experience. During World War II, since her family was of Japanese descent, they were moved from their homes in the Pacific Northwest to internment camps in the desert of California. In the years that they lived there, they lost their businesses and their connections to home.

In this story produced for Minnesota Public Radio News' Youth Radio Series, Mara starts with an inteview with her Grandmother, travels to California with her great aunts, and starts to understand the impact of this event on her family. Stay tuned after the feature, because Mara and I had a conversation and she told me some details that are not in the final piece.

Play

Above and to the right is photo of Mara and her Aunt Matsue. They are at the memorial to the internees on Bainbridge Island in Seattle, where most of Mara's family lives now.

To learn more about Japanese American internment, don't just stop at the Wikipedia page (though it is a good jumping off point.) Check out the now National Historic site of Manzanar, the camp that Auntie Matsue and Mara's grandma were interned at, and also the web page for Mara's piece, where MPR News has a slideshow of photographs of Mara and her family as well as historical shots from the 40s.

Different, Not Disabled by Ian Kathan of WHJE

December 1, 2010 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

Ian Kathan, a student at Carmel High School and a producer at their radio station, WHJE, has Asperger's Syndrome, and he wants everyone to know that he is just fine. In fact, he wouldn't wish his life to be any other way. In his profile of himself, Ian describes why thinking of himself as living with a "disorder"  merely makes excuses for his behavior. The way he is, is who he is! He also talks with a doctor he's worked with for years about why you can't get away with excusing your problems on a disability.
Ian describes his piece this way:
Taking a bound away from logic, I've gone and explored my own mind, and what I found is something that can't be told, it needs to be experienced. When you listen to this, I ask that you go in with an open mind, and try to imagine the best you can. I promise I'll try my best to explain what it is like to be… well, me.
Well, enough typing. Take a listen!
Play
Intro music is Different by Suhov / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0. Outro music is Our Ego [Feat. Different Visitor] by Broke For Free / CC BY 3.0. Both tracks plus much more Creative Commons licensed music can be found at the Free Music Archive.

I Didn't Know That (You Were a Muslim) by Tali Singer

November 17, 2010 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

When Beth first started college, she knew she was interested in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies. But when she began taking classes, she found she was more interested in the spirituality of Islam than its politics. Then, in 2008, this 6-foot-tall, Irish-Catholic girl from upstate New York made the decision to convert to Islam. A confident, and deep-thinking young woman, Beth describes how this new identity feels natural to her even when it is causing tension in her family.

I Didn't Know That (You Were A Muslim) is a short portrait of Beth's spiritual journey by independent producer Tali Singer. After the story, listen to a conversation Tali and I had about finding a good story and why being an independent producer is not for everyone.

Play

Couple links to help y'all out: In our conversation, Tali mentions apprenticing with Dmae Roberts and what a grant-writing beast Dmae is. In fact, she is a such an expert, she a has a great, resourceful blog on the topic: Funding Your Bliss. This is well worth a look through if you are setting out on your own for any project for which you need funding.

Tali and I also talk about the Third Coast International Audio Festival, where we met! Third Coast is a radio conference and competition for audio producers. Tali was part of the Pitch Panel, a session that allowed producers to pitch their stories face to face with editors of  national shows and popular podcasts. Listen to both of those pitch sessions here and here, along with more session audio from Third Coast if you can't make it until 2012. Tali mentions that this conference was overwhelming (and I agree!), so we both should have reviewed Dmae's article on Conference Mapping.

Hear more of Tali's profiles over at PRX.


Intro music is called Journey To The Moon by DjCode / CC BY-SA 3.0

Outro music is called Mamma Roots Daddy by Lax-o-mat / CC BY-SA 3.0