Youth EB Picks: A Tune To Change The Way We Act from RadioActive Youth Media

July 31, 2013 in GPRX Blog by Milton Guevara

Thrift 2

I was introduced to the rap song “Thrift Shop,” by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, in my third period class. There was a conversation about thrifting when a classmate started singing, “I’m gonna pop some tags, only got twenty dollars in my pocket.” I was hooked. Now when the song comes up on the radio, you bet I’m singing along. “Thrift Shop” doesn’t come off as being the typical rap song. While many rap songs are about spending money on bling, Macklemore raps about saving money.

A Tune To Change The Way We Act  from Seattle's RadioActive Youth Media is about how the popular song has inspired its listeners to get into thrift shopping. I love this radio story. It’s engaging and fun. Those who don’t thrift shop or listen to rap could find pleasure in the writing.

One thing that strikes me is the professionalism of the piece. With smooth transitions and precise volume levels, this well-paced story is made with high quality. It held on to my attention and left me satisfied when it was finished.

In this piece, there were perspectives from a shopper who started thrifting because of the song, a thrift shop employee, and an avid thrift shopper. They share what they think of “Thrift Shop” and what their thrifting experiences have been like.

One idea that was talked about was whether thrift shopping is going to continue to be popular. The way the piece ended, it seemed the producer didn’t think so. As someone who is already a thrift shopper, I hope that thrift shopping can continue being a craze. It is economical on the wallet and sustainable for the environment. Thrifting is just cool all around.

Japanese-American Granddaughter Questions Internment by Mara Kumagai Fink for MPR News Youth Radio

December 29, 2010 in Youthcast by Molly Adams

A New Year usually means a new beginning. It’s time to look back, figure out what worked and what didn’t and then move on with your life. But obviously there are some events and histories that you can’t abandon so easily. Mara Kumagai Fink’s family has that kind of American experience. During World War II, since her family was of Japanese descent, they were moved from their homes in the Pacific Northwest to internment camps in the desert of California. In the years that they lived there, they lost their businesses and their connections to home.

In this story produced for Minnesota Public Radio News' Youth Radio Series, Mara starts with an inteview with her Grandmother, travels to California with her great aunts, and starts to understand the impact of this event on her family. Stay tuned after the feature, because Mara and I had a conversation and she told me some details that are not in the final piece.

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Above and to the right is photo of Mara and her Aunt Matsue. They are at the memorial to the internees on Bainbridge Island in Seattle, where most of Mara's family lives now.

To learn more about Japanese American internment, don't just stop at the Wikipedia page (though it is a good jumping off point.) Check out the now National Historic site of Manzanar, the camp that Auntie Matsue and Mara's grandma were interned at, and also the web page for Mara's piece, where MPR News has a slideshow of photographs of Mara and her family as well as historical shots from the 40s.